becoming

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing industry by engaging literary artists in projects that bring collective economic development.

The Women Changing the Face of Publishing

In 2009, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie gave a Ted Talk about the danger of a single story.

As a child in Nigeria, she wrote about what she had read in other stories, which primarily featured white American or British characters. Her characters were also white and drank ginger beer, something Adichie had never tasted. But soon she found characters of color, and her stories began reflecting her own experiences. From that she discovered what we lose by hearing from only one point of view.

Exhibits at Minnesota African American museum keep George Floyd’s spirit alive

Tina Burnside doesn’t want people to think that George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police was an isolated incident. Co-founder of the Minnesota African American Heritage Museum and Gallery, she sees it as part of Minnesota’s history of systemic racism.

“A lot of people were surprised by George Floyd’s killing, and we want people to know it didn’t happen in a vacuum,” said Burnside, a journalist-turned-attorney. “Even though Minnesota has this history of being a progressive state, there is a lot of racial discrimination and disparity that has happened to African Americans.”

Black writers talk healing and the importance of shared experiences

Pulitzer Prize winner Gwendolyn Brooks knew the value of Black publishers as both marketers and, importantly, an empowering social and cultural construct. Which is why, in 2002, she turned down a lucrative deal to stay with Harper & Row, going instead with Black publishing companies Broadside Press and later, Third World Press.

Towards An African Education: A Biia Book Review

Summary:
This book is a collection of articles written by the Black community for the Black community. These articles focus on education in our communities especially with a focus on children and us as an African people. By communities I mean all our communities. Some articles focus on our communities in the United States, some focus on education in Africa and some on both. I personally enjoy how each article speaks in a different tone. Some articles feel flowy like a story, some are very fact based with lots of graphs and pie charts, and some were heavy on the academic side as in jargon and concepts. I liked the variety and I particularly enjoyed not knowing what type of article I was going to read next. What can I say I just love surprises!

My Favorite Part:
My favorite article was the third article ” A Historical Review of the Role Black Parents and the Black Community Played in Providing Schooling for Black Children in the South 1865-1954.” by Dr. Josie Johnson. This was my favorite because it was almost like a historical story. Personally, I love reading about our period in history after enslavement and before the Civil Rights Movement. This article is important because it takes the myth that Black parents don’t value or care about their children’s education, rips it apart and throws it away. The myth has always been foolish and it actually kind of breaks my heart that it even exists but it felt good to read that article and laugh at how obvious the importance that education has to Black parents in the past, now and forever.

Uri-Biia Si-Asar

The Gift from the Stars
A Biia journey doing Biia things in a Biia world

Biia Thoughts:
I’m excited that the very first book that I have reviewed on “paper” or I guess the first written review that I have ever done is on Towards an African Education: by Elder Mahmoud El-Kati. For three reasons: 1. It was basically the first book that I ended up touching since I’ve returned to America. 2. Quite a few people that I actually know or have at least met and interacted with more than once has an article in this book and 3. Elder Mahmoud El-Kati… do I really need to say more.

Also at the end of the book there are many resources for you to continue our journey and study into learning about the education of our community. There’s a list of key points and summaries from the book! Honestly all books should have this at the back just so that if you don’t read the book quickly you can be reminded of what you read also it serves as a nice point of reflection where you can review everything that has been talked about. There’s quotes about education from prominent Black leaders. There’s a booklist filled with books on education. There’s even a list of organizations that support, encourage and foster opportunities for quality education. like come on people it does not get any easier than this!!! If you are at all curious about education or want to continue learning about education for our community this is the place to start!! and it shows you where to go afterwards like ugggghhh I can’t even express to you how perfect this book is for that.

Favorite quote from the Book:

The chief aim of life is not simnply to be happy.
The chief aim of life is to be useful,
To be responsible,
To be compassionate,
To count for something
To make it matter that you lived at all.

Random:
• I keep kicking myself because I want to have all the contributors sign my book but I keep leaving it at home when I go to events that I KNOW they will be at SMH how Biia How?!
• You all should read the book and come the Sankofa Series: Book Reading and Dicussion events! There’s one every month. It’s ran by In Black Ink so you should check out their facebook page and instagram @MNinBlackInk. Yes I do volunteer with them and yes this is my shameless plug.
• I am slightly disappointed in myself for taking so long to read this. But life has just been so crazy and getting back into the rhythm of America aka the busyness of it took longer than I thought but I think I finally got the balance to add reading back into my life.

Rating Scale

💥 = i regret reading this
💥💥 = meh. Not really for me
💥💥💥 =it was good/fine
💥💥💥💥 =i would own it😊
💥💥💥💥💥 = i would reread this hundreds of times. I would own it and pass it down to future generations.

https://giftfromthestars.wordpress.com/2020/01/27/towards-an-african-education-a-biia-book-
review/?fbclid=IwAR22TvYY5AiJWe73pccKIY273LBLZtKiSI7HZcRb4Yp5xzgZDrZCZdcQoJ0

Here is a pdf download of the review.

Book Reading and Discussion – A Sankofa Series Event

In this event, three of our selected authors will read and discuss their writings; Mahmoud El-Kati, Professor Emeritus of Macalester College, Eric Mahmoud President/CEO/Founder of Seed Academy and Harvest Best Academy, and Dr. Rose Brewer, Professor in Department of African American & African Studies at the University of Minnesota.

Download the event brochure here.

Upcoming reading and discussion schedule:

 

MN African American Heritage Museum
1256 Penn Ave N, Minneapolis, MN 55411
Fri. February 21, 2020
6:00-8:00pm

Rondo Community Library
461 Dale St N, St Paul, MN 55103
Sat. March 7, 2020
1:00-3:00pm

Nu Skool of Afrikan American Thought
1166 University Ave W, St Paul, MN 55104
Fri., March 27, 2020
6:30-8:30pm

For more Information:
MNInBlackInk@gmail.com
651-231-6604

In Black Ink advances cause of children’s education

“Towards an African Education: Selected Writings on the Education and
Development of Children of African Heritage” edited by Mahmoud El-Kati, is the newest offering from In Black Ink.

The book launched in October in conjunction with In Black Ink’s Sankofa Series event “Educating Our Children in the 21st Century.” The showcase had the trappings of a richly grassroots aesthetic, enlisting many culturally noted individuals.

Keynote speaker was Third World Press founder Dr. Haki Mahubuti—once known as literary legend of the Black Arts Movement Don L. Lee. Mahmoud El-Kati delivered the address, “Towards an African Education: An Overview.”

Serving as emcee was local media powerhouse Lissa Jones, producer-creator-host of KMOJ’s hugely popular “Urban Agenda,” and host of the Givens Foundation for African American literature podcast “Black Market Reads.”

“Towards an African Education” is impressive, to say the least—before you open the book. El-Kati contributing “Towards an African Education: A Critical Essay.” Rekhet Si-Asar of In Black Ink and Papyrus Publishing Inc., Josie Johnson and Dr. Rose Brewer are also contributors.

Educational and engaging, the general tone is academic but not stiff, as the writing tends to be conversationally
informative. Something college and high school students wouldn’t mind getting assigned since it’s sagely enlightening without being so densely cerebral.

Revered activist, Johnson, whose memoir “Hope in the Struggle” was published this year, contributed “A Historical
Review of the Role Black Parents and the Black Community Played in Providing Schooling for Black Children in the South 1865 – 1954.”

Excerpted from her mid-1980s dissertation, Johnson attests, “Because the history of Black people is often ignored or presented in an inadequate manner, the extent of the role Black parents played in providing schooling, during the slavery years and beyond, has not been available even to some scholars otherwise knowledgeable about Black interest in education. The fact that Black parents and the Black community were significant factors in the provision of schooling for their children needs additional documentation and dissemination.”

Dr. Brewer is, among other accomplishments, a noted professor of African American and African studies at the University of Minnesota. Her “The Struggle Continues for an African Education” issues, in part, an indictment against America for a system that, in the guise of social progress, covertly sustains age-old bigotry, forcing the fight for education to go on after all this time.

“This turning away from educational justice is expressed in a willing embrace of dismantling laws and government policies, which support educational equality,” laments Brewer. “No need for these since a segment of the society proclaims this is now expendable in a so-called “colorblind society or they more vulgarly assert Black children are the source of their own lack of educational achievement.

“This shift in articulation of what the stakes are should also be thought about in the context of what I call transformed economic space with deep consequences for Black educational inequality in the U.S. today.”

“Towards an African Education,” suffice to say, shows In Black Ink’s strong commitment to advance young minds.

The book reading and discussion of “Towards an African Education” with Mahmoud El-Kati and contributors took place Dec. 7 from 1-3 pm at The Reading Room – Model Cities Brownstone, located at 839 University Ave. W. in St. Paul.

Download the PDF copy.

Black Women Must Write, and Publish!

In this segment of Urban Agenda, I’m in studio with Rekhet Si-Asar, Founder of ‘Ink Black Ink’, and Lesley Anne Brown, Author of ‘Decolonial Daughter: Letters from a Black Woman to her European Son‘. Join us as we explore myriad issues that are a part of living as black women in the world, and our strivings to celebrate ourselves and our sisters!

In Black Ink (IBI) has made it their purpose to make sure the stories of Minnesota’s black communities are heard. With a FUBU (For Us, By Us) mentality, IBI strives to capture the untold stories of African heritage Minnesotans by creating and publishing a database of black writers, editors, illustrators, distribution reps and other publishing.

Read full article here

Sankofa Series Event

A Series of Workshops for the Business of Artists

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people of African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing industry by engaging literary artists in projects that bring collective economic development.

Elder’s Writing Project

A Series of Workshops for the Business of Artists

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing industry by engaging literary artists in projects that bring collective economic development.

Community Initiated Projects

A Series of Workshops for the Business of Artists

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing industry by engaging literary artists in projects that bring collective economic development.

SANKOFA SERIES AND EVENT

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing industry by engaging literary artists in projects that bring collective economic development.

LITERARY ARTIST DATABASE

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing industry by engaging literary artists in projects that bring collective economic development.

ELDER STORIES AND ARCHIVAL

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing industry by engaging literary artists in projects that bring collective economic development.

Kindred

Kindred

Octavia Butler

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing.
Kindred

Kindred

Octavia Butler

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing.
Kindred

Kindred

Octavia Butler

In Black Ink (IBI) is a social enterprise that seeks to create inter-generational literature bout people f African descent in Minnesota. IBI supports the publishing.

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